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Crosscutting initiatives

News on CSOs’ involvement into the area of Aid and development effectiveness in Kyrgyzstan

Growing engagement of Kyrgyzstan civil society into aid and development effectiveness and implementation of the PD, AAA and Busan agreements. It led in the end of July to development of the Monitoring framework of the National Partnership on aid and development effectiveness with indicators based on Global partnership monitoring inKyrgyzstanand plan of actions.

 

In Kyrgyzstan the involvement of Civil society into this area started in 2007.

With the establishment of new specialized bodies — Public Watch Councils (PWC) -for better and more institutionalized interaction between civil society and State a process of involvement of these bodies started in 2011.  In December 2012 the Coordination Council of the Public Watch Councils integrated into the PWCs’ annual 2013 work plan activities on strengthening partnership on aid and development effectiveness and monitoring of aid and development effectiveness inKyrgyzstan. UNDP within its “Capacity Development Facility project” in Kyrgyzstan has supported two training workshops.  I should be noted the efficiency of the cooperation of the CC of PWCs and UNDP was really amazing.

In May — June several discussions with PWCs led to a decision to start training of members of PWC to increase their capacity and enable them to better understand policies, history, process and various frameworks.

This work was especially visible as an important in the light of the totally nontransparent, non-inclusive process of  holding in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan during July 10-11, 2013 of the High Level Development Conference, resulting in the “Joint Conference Document. A Reform-Based Development Partnership, 2013 –2017”.

 

In June – August 2013 the following work was done by CSOs within this process.

 Members of the Working Groups on aid and development effectiveness of the PWCs expressed concern that civil society organizations are not adequately engaged in the partnership on aid and development effectiveness. The have agreed to take part in the partnership  development and one of the ways to do so is participation at the monitoring process at the national level which is following the global process.

Weak national partnership and weak participation of CSOs in the process related to aid and development effectiveness in Kyrgyzstan led to slow process of aid and development effectiveness.

Besides it was agreed to advance our findings and advocate for bettering national partnership.

 

Agenda formulation

  

  • Identifying areas of concern from the aid and development effectiveness perspectives:
    • Lack of clear country  development results framework
    • Lack of implementation of partnership  development agreements
    • Lack of CSOs capacity
    • Lack of CSOs engagement and of the engagement space for CSOs
    • Strengthening institutional ties in CSOs for joint work
  •  Building capacity
  • Monitoring of commitments and planned actions
  • Communication and advocacy with other  development partners

 

 Capacity  development:

  •  Two training workshops (each three days long) were held on basics of aid and development effectiveness and its monitoring: 1 inJune — “The basics of aid and development effectiveness and civil society organization’s positions on the Paris declaration, AAA and Busan outcome document”  and 2nd in July -  “The basics of monitoring and advancing implementation of commitments in the framework of  Paris declaration, Accra’s action plan and Pusan partnership agreement”
  • Joint goals of both workshops were strengthening of the effectiveness of the development of the PWCs,  strengthening of the role of PWCs, its role as part of CSOs as development actor in its own rights; facilitation of PWCs’ engagement in aid and development effectiveness monitoring and play a role in this as a development actor; one of the objectives was to start preparation to a consolidated evaluation agreements and to start monitoring of implementation of Paris Declaration, Accra Agenda for Actions, Busan partnership agreement.
  • In the results of training a Monitoring framework of the National Partnership on aid and development effectiveness with indicators based on Global partnership monitoring and advancing implementation of commitments in the framework of Paris declaration, Accra’s action plan and Busan partnership agreement was developed.
  • Previous work and involvement into aid and development effectiveness process allowed to invite two experts from the Forum of women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan, this NGO that led this process before in Kyrgyzstan. These experts were Nurgul Dzhanaeva and Bermet Stakeeva. Training materials and methodology were designed by Nurgul Dzhanaeva, a member of the PWCs, of the informal coalition on aid and development effectiveness in Kyrgyzstan, and a member of the Global Council of the CPDE, and Bermet Stakeeva, who was in charge of data collection for the Kyrgyzstan CSOs shadow report on aid and development effectiveness under the leadership of ROA in 2011, preparation of training on aid and development effectiveness for CSOs in2010 in Kyrgyzstan.

Advocacy

Members of the newly established working group (WG) on aid and development effectiveness were highly enthusiastic and during quite short period of time managed not only to create this WG but collect diverse data from their state agencies and identify issues for their further watch and analysis. About 15 meetings during June-August 2013 were held by this WG for detailizing and better visioning ways of involvement in aid and development effectiveness area as a full partner.

National monitoring will make an input to a broader political dialogue on aid and development effectiveness co-operation and its effectiveness in Kyrgyzstan.  Evidence generated by the indicators will be pushing and complementing the official monitoring in Kyrgyzstan. One of the priority areas of monitoring and advocacy is identification of development concrete results as part of the national sustainable development strategy and of the national strategy for development of partnership. Besides our aim is to encourage that in Kyrgyzstan own national framework and tools are in place to monitor the effectiveness of development co-operation.  Initial visioning of data collection and validation will be detalized and followed by scheduled meetings of Working groups members.

 

 Reporting and dissemination of findings will be done through our advocacy and advancing plan

 

Date Activity
July- August 2013 Monitoring of indicator #2 on Enabling Environment for civil society  under the bigger CPDE framework under the leadership of  CIVICUS
July — October Meetings with individual donor agencies
July — October Meetings with a national coordinator of ODA, with individual  State agencies, with government
September 2013 Presentation and discussion of monitoring plans at the conference on monitoring of external  loans
September 2013 Conference of CSOs on aid and development effectiveness
November 2013 Presentation and discussion of monitoring plans, results at the international  conference of PWCs
November 2013 Meetings with Jogorku kenesh, National Parliament of Kyrgyzstan
November – December 2013 Multi stakeholders’ dialogue (Government, JK, business, CSO)
Constantly Work with Mass Media
Constantly Involvement of other PWCS and CSOs, who are not yet engaged

 

Monitoring

In order to strengthen country democratic ownership, transparency, orientation on results, country accountability on aid and development effectiveness, integration of human rights and gender equality, ecological sustainability, which are together comprise a solid basis of conflict prevention at various levels, participants drafted the monitoring framework of the National Partnership on aid and development effectiveness with indicators based on Global partnership monitoring.

During training and development of monitoring framework PWCs used widely a Monitoring Framework of  Global Partnership, produced by OECD and UNDP.

 

Purpose of national monitoring

The purpose of the national monitoring framework is to support national accountability for “making progress in the implementation of commitments and actions agreed in  Busan ” (Busan  Partnership agreement  §35).

It  places particular emphasis on behavior change in development co-operation efforts, which is in turn expected to contribute to the achievement of results  as defined in the Kyrgyzstan development strategy.  Its aim is not to monitor development outcomes  themselves, which are addressed through other international frameworks  (e.g.  the Millennium Development Goals).

Participation of CSOs in national monitoring efforts  is  important to provide evidence of progress and signal opportunities as well as obstacles for further progress.

In this process, national monitoring efforts contribute to:  Support accountability for the implementation of the Busan commitments and actions by providing a snapshot of progress at the national level;  Stimulate  multi-stakeholder  dialogue at country and provincial levels on how to  improve the effectiveness of development co-operation; and support accountability at country level.

The focus on accountability will be on of central features of the  Busan  Partnership  agreement implementation.

CSOs as  development partners have a common agenda for development in different way.  CSOs pay also special attention in monitoring of implementation of commitments regarding enabling environment for CSO. One of the important monitoring indicator is going to be conditionality.

 

Indicators and targets 

After thorough review the following indicators и targets for 2015 from the global monitoring framework were agreed to be taken as a basis for monitoring of the National Partnership on aid and development effectiveness and one additional indicator was added:

  1. Development co-operation is focused on results that meet developing countries’ priorities
  2. Civil society operates within an environment which maximises its engagement in and contribution to development -  Enabling Environment Index
  3. Engagement and contribution of the private sector to development
  4. Transparency: information on development co-operation is publicly available
  5. Development co-operation is more predictable
  6. Aid is on budgets which are subject to parliamentary scrutiny
  7. Mutual accountability among development co-operation actors is strengthened through inclusive reviews
  8. Gender equality and women’s empowerment
  9. Effective institutions: developing countries’ systems  are strengthened and used
  10. Aid is untied
  11. Conditionalities.

 

Indicative timeline for 2013- 2014

  • July- August 2013 – monitoring of indicator #2 on Enabling Environment for civil society  under the bigger CPDE framework under the leadership of  CIVICUS.
  • August –December 2013 -  pilot monitoring of two ministries (health and education) with application of all indicators.
  • September 2013 – February 2014 – Monitoring of SWAP implementation and planning of SWAP.
  • September 2013 – February 2014 – Monitoring of financial flows in State agency for realization of punishment was identified as part of the monitoring framework

Monitoring of Enabling environment started in August 2013  as part of the global process under the leadership of APRN and CIVICUS

 

Training 1 in June

Collected and used materials let participants to study, understand and discuss and be engaged in future planning of ODA, aid and development effectiveness; Variety of resources were identified for participants at the international, national levels; state, donor and CSOs levels;

Materials were collected to enable participants to understand not only the process but also see the role of various stakeholders in the development process.

Presented materials allowed participants to analyze differences of various stakeholders’ positions.

Materials were developed and presented in the way that they can be used in future by not only participants, but by their follow members of PWCs that were not present at the training. Materials were disseminated at the training and participants decided that they are worth of putting them at the PWCs’ site.

Participants were invited from PWCs and having the fact that not all PWCs have full list of members, candidates for PWCs were also invited. A list of criteria was made to selection and engagement process into this training. For effective work it was important that participants had some background in aid monitoring and close cooperation with their relevant state ministries and agencies.

Three days training on capacity building of members of PWCs was held with 32 participants from PWCs in a village Kashka-Suu from 19.06.2013 till 21.06.2013. Training results were the following:

  • Capacity of 32 participants from PWCs was raised through acquaintance with a history and documents on ODA — Paris Declaration, Accra Agenda for Actions, Pusan partnership agreement — bettering understanding of provisions of ODA, joint discussion of major documents and development of joint vision on ODA, joint planning by participants of the monitoring of the effectiveness of the ODA and of development of  Kyrgyzstan; acquaintance with an international process of CSOs participation in ODA related processes; preparation of  PWCs to a consolidates assessment of the Aid and Development, acquaintance with such documents questionnaire on PD implementation for donors, governments; acquaintance with a history of CSO involvement in Kyrgyzstan and Central Asia. Important that participants gained knowledge on shift from aid  effectiveness to development effectiveness.
  • Participants discussed PWCs’ plans for 2013-2014. Participants development recommendations for the July 2013 Forum of donors;  development plans of monitoring and concrete actions such as possible organization of multi-stakeholders’ dialogues, communication process setting with development actors in Kyrgyzstan;
  • Participants created an intra-PWCs working group with several thematic sub-groups on aid and development effectiveness with its leadership and mission and vision, with a communication mechanism and draft of schedule and work plan.
  • Participants agreed to partner with the existing informal coalition of CSOs of OAD and development effectiveness led by the Forum of women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan, Association of CSOs support center and NGO “Citizens against corruption”.
  • Participants agreed that this group will lead to a shift from isolated projects monitoring to a holistic, systematic , comprehensive and consolidated monitoring which can show results of the ODA in Kyrgyzstan.
  • Participants decided that it is important to intergrade this theme in the PWCS’ agenda.
  • Participants agreed that there is a need in further strengthening of the capacity of the members of the intra-PWCs WG, but also of wider members of the PWCs.
  • Participants decided to step into dialogue with decision-making bodies of the country as well as with donors of Kyrgyzstan.

 

 Training 2 in July

1.    Three days training on capacity building of members of Working Group of PACs on the theme “The basics of monitoring and advancing implementation of commitments in the framework of  Paris declaration,Accra’s action plan and Pusan partnership agreement” was held with 12 participants from PACs in a village Kalmak-Ashu from 26.07.2013 till 28.07.2013.  Training results were the following:

  •  Capacity of 12 participants from PACs was raised through acquaintance with a history, process and documents on monitoring of ODA — Paris Declaration, Accra Agenda for Actions
  • Bettering understanding of basic of monitoring of the ODA: goals and objectives and results in relation to ODA.
  • Increase of understanding of majors frameworks, processes and indicators of ODA monitoring and relevant documents through:
  1. Discussion of monitoring framework and
  2. Human rights, gender equality as one of the important indicators in the framework.
  • Basic understanding of the key features of the global monitoring framework, ten indicators of progress and associated targets  that are designed to support global accountability, the purpose of the global monitoring framework
  • Detailed discussion of the indicators  and targets and their relevance to Kyrgyzstan monitoring of  ODA
  • Introduction the monitoring process as an element of advocacy and advancing of the agreements in PD, AAA and Busan partnership agreement.
  1.  Development of monitoring goals and objectives and results of the Working Groups of the PACs
  2.  development of the mechanism of monitoring and partnership of different stakeholders.
  • Training led to identification of key indicators which Working group of PACs will use for monitoring and advancing, as well as for  influencing on timely and full implementation of the taken commitments.
  • Recommendations for CSOs on partnership between State and CSOs for effective monitoring.
  • Questions and recommendations on monitoring were developed for future meetings with representatives with State (government and Parliament) and donors.
  • Recommendations to include human rights, women’s rights, ecological sustainability and other important issues into monitoring.
  • Contribution to a preliminary program of the future multi-stakeholders meeting on ODA.
  • Plans of monitoring and initiating and participation in various dialogues were drafted and adopted.
  1. Working group analyzed Indicator 2 of the Global monitoring — Civil society operates within an environment that maximizes its engagement in and contribution to development – discussion a CIVICUS Assessing the Enabling Environment and its Work plan on Monitoring CSO Enabling Environment and decided to conduct monitoring in Kyrgyzstan following this plan.

 

  • During the training participatory and interest provoking methods were actively used, as well as lecturing. Methods aimed at acquaintance, involvement to empowering during the training were used. Training various methods included experience sharing, presentations of monitoring frameworks, panel discussions, analysis of documents, group discussions, joint development of monitoring plans and joint future planning, division of monitoring tasks of key indicators, case analysis, individual work with participants, involvement of participants into preparatory activities.
  • Collected and used materials let participants to study, understand and discuss and be engaged in planning of development partnership  and aid and development effectiveness monitoring; Variety of resources were identified for participants at the international, national levels; state, donor and CSOs levels;
  • Materials were collected to enable participants to understand not only the process but also see the role of various stakeholders in the development process.
  • Presented materials allowed participants to analyze differences of various stakeholders’ positions.
  • Materials were developed and presented in the way that they can be used in future by not only participants, but by their follow members of PACs that were not present at the training. Materials were disseminated at the training and participants decided that they are worth of putting them at the PACs’ site.
  • Participants were invited from PACs and having the fact that not all PACs have full list of members, candidates for PACs were also invited. A list of criteria was made to selection and engagement process into this training. For effective work it was important that participants had some background in aid monitoring and close cooperation with their relevant state ministries and agencies.
  • It was agreed to the do follow up in the form of TOT as it was identified as useful for sustaining the achieved progress in building capacity of participants.
  • Materials allowed participants to make an initial draft of the monitoring framework of the National Partnership on aid and development effectiveness with the initial visioning of data collection and validation.

All discussed and approved indicators и targets as part of the Monitoring Framework of the National Partnership on aid and development effectiveness  will enable not only to measure progress but also to identify challenges and opportunities, including conflict risks and sustaining peace at early stages. They include (1) Development co-operation is focused on results that meet developing countries’ priorities, (2) enabling environment for Civil society, (3) Engagement and contribution of the private sector to development, (4) Transparency: information on development co-operation is publicly available, (5)  Development co-operation is more predictable , (6)Aid is on budgets which are subject to parliamentary scrutiny, (7) Mutual accountability among development co-operation actors is strengthened through inclusive reviews, (8) Gender equality and women’s empowerment, (9) Effective institutions: developing countries’ systems  are strengthened and used, (10) Aid is untied.

  1. Increased ownership of  development and of ODA by civil society decreases risks of corruption, of future possible conflicts and strengthens peace,
  2. The adopted monitoring framework strengthens citizens’ engagement into political processes and public policy and by this ,
  3. During the discussions at the training participants were led to link aid and development effectiveness with models of aid and participants agreed to take as one of their monitoring attention SWAP
  4. Future planned positive influence on national development strategies and sectoral strategies, with impact on production of national and provincial development results framework will enable PWCs to include conflict and governance issues into policy dialogues if the context requires.
  5. Planning of stakeholders’ consultation is one of the ways to reduce future conflicts.

During the training a draft of the monitoring framework of the National Partnership on aid and development effectiveness with indicators based on Global partnership monitoring and advancing implementation of commitments in the framework of Paris declaration, Accra’s action plan and Pusan partnership agreement was developed.

  1. During the training participants were able to develop a new mechanism of engagement into ODA as development partners.
  •    Initiate stakeholders and multi stakeholders’ dialogues,
  •      Participation in the National Coordination Council on Partnership
  •   Mechanism of monitoring  with indicators and responsible persons was drafted.
  •    Monitoring framework included communication policy, strengthening partnership and increasing CSOs involvement, advocacy and advancing mechanism at various levels, timing.
  •  Monitoring will be piloted in the two selected ministries (Ministry of Health and Ministry of education).
  •  Monitoring of financial flows in State agency for realization of punishment was identified as part of the monitoring framework
  •     A monitoring plan on indicator 2 of the Global partnership monitoring framework was adopted.

2. Follow up plans of both on monitoring and advocacy for advancing implementation of taken commitments in PD, AAA and Busan partnership agreement were developed.

Nurgul Djanaeva, Presidend Forum of women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan

 

 

 

Development  and aid  effectiveness 

Financing for development

2007 — The issue of financing for development is being discussed around the world by governments, donors, international organizations and NGOs.

Forum of women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan has held a number of meetings to raise awareness of civil society on the Paris Declaration, Monterey Consensus, recommendations prepared by the International CSO (Civil Society Organisations) Steering Group for the High Level Forum in Accra in September 2008. These recommendations were translated by staff of Forum of women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan and published at the international site of IBON: www.betteraid.org. All materials were distributed to NGOs.

 

Implementation in 2011

Alternative review of the implementation of the Paris Declaration and the Accra Agenda for Action commitments at country level and will compile the country reports into a special report that will serve as a shadow report to the official evaluation and monitoring report

Monitoring of the implementation of the Paris Declaration and the Accra Agenda for Action commitments in Kyrgyzstan led to the following findings. Ownership of the country development strategy and ODA is limited to the Government and donors. Parliament, local governance and of CSOs were not playing key roles, commitments of the AAA are  not  implemented in major areas of the country development. Development and ODA results for the people are not visible and lack not only proper measurement and monitoring, but lack substantial content. These results  represent critical concerns since the real ownership and people’s empowerment are not in the reform agenda, are not used for effective use of financial and all other resources and political commitments remain again on paper.

 

The shadow repot consist:

 Democratic Ownership

I.       Participation

II.    Transparency

III.    Accountability

IV.     Development Results

V.       Gender equality

VI.     Ecological sustainability

VII.  Conclusion

 

Read more>>>

 

 

Implementation in 2010

 

December 2010 – Multi-stakeholders’ meeting on “From Aid effectiveness to development effectiveness”

Objectives of the multi-stakeholders’ meeting on “Aid effectiveness” 16 December 2010

  • Creation or strengthening of enabling environment for partnership

 

Outputs

  • Transfer of CSO recommendations to the country evaluation team
  • Agreement with country donors on information dissemination, data and information gathering and access
  • CSOs’ voice and recommendations are reflected in PD and AAA evaluation,  such as HR, women’s rights and gender equality

 

Outcomes

  • Development of multi stakeholders’ communication mechanism
  • Validation of official findings and presentation of the final report on monitoring AAA implementation and CSO recommendations for HLF4
  • Involvement of CSOs’ representatives in country aid monitoring related teams

 

 

 

 

15 December 2010  – CSO meeting for development of CSO recommendation “Effectiveness of Aid”

 

 Tasks of CSO meeting Effectiveness of Aid on 15 December 2010

  • Reporting and defining problems of monitoring of PD and AAA implementation: on process and results
  • Development of CSO recommendations and their transfer to country evaluation team
  • Preparation for multilateral meeting “Effectiveness of Aid”

Outputs

Discussion, development and approval of CSO recommendations for county evaluations team for implementation of PD and AAA

  • Development of CSO suggestions for donors of Kyrgyzstan and state on spreading information, gathering and access to data and information
  • CSO recommendations include recommendation of human rights, woman rights and gender equality, on ecological sustainability and other important society problems
  • Preparation of CSO alternative report on implementation of PD and AAA in Kyrgyzstan

Outcomes

  •  CSOs have their own strategic communication mechanism between different development members
    • CSOs have their own suggestions for access and work with official data and for presentation of final report on AAA monitoring and CSO recommendation for HLF4 from state and donors of Kyrgyzstan
    • Drawing CSOs’ representatives into national aid monitoring groups and other corresponding groups
  •  Presentation of CSO report on implementation of PD and AAA in Kyrgyzstan

 

 

18 November 2010 – Round table with state representatives “Effectiveness of Aid”

 

The goal of the round table with state representatives “Effectiveness of Aid” is developing or strengthening of enabling environment for partnership between state bodies and civil society organizations.

 

Tasks of Round Table on 18 November 2010

  •  Discussion of ways of partnership and cooperation between CSOs and state bodies on aid effectiveness
  • Agreement on joint actions
  • Presentation of preliminary results of AAA implementation results
  • Development of communication mechanism between CSOs and state bodies

 

 

13 September 2010 – CSOs’ Round Table on advocacy of PD and AAA

 

 Objectives of the  CSOs’ Round Table on advocacy of PD and AAA 13  September 2010

 

  • Creation of a CSO coalition for  strengthening of an enabling environment for partnership with all stakeholders
  • Creation of a CSO working group to monitor the implementation of AAA

 

Agenda of CSO’s Round Table on 13 September 2010

  1. Discussion of similar international process
  2. Discussion of project’s program
  3. ROA Bulletin
  4. Discussion of CSO monitoring scheme
  5. Issue of creation of a CSO coalition for  strengthening of an enabling environment for partnership with all stakeholders
  6. Creation of CSO working group to monitor the implementation of PD and AAA

Twenty Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) from all regions of Kyrgyzstan created a Network for Effectiveness of Development on Round Table on Advocacy of Paris Declaration (PD) and Accra Action Agenda (AAA) “From Effectiveness of Aid to Effectiveness of Development” on 13 September2010 inBishkek.

CSOs consider that at the moment there is a lack of reliable and timely publicly available information on many aspects of aid and related strategies and conditions of our country’s development. There is a lack of independent evaluations of activities of donors, state and other groups working with aid, and evaluations of influence and results of the aid. There is a lack of opportunities for citizens and CSOs to make their voices heard in decision making process on development of our country. All these factors create systematic obstacles for state’s accountability in front of citizens.

Our country participated in adoption of such documents as PD and AAA that regulate official aid and that commit both state and donors to involve CSOs into the process of elaboration of country development strategies, monitoring of aid and country developemnt strategy.

CSOs assume that effectiveness of aid should be measured by results of country’s development.

Partnership of CSOs and state bodies is necessary for monitoring the implementation of PD and AAA. Round table with participation of CSOs and state representatives is conducted for strengthening such partnership

 

Conference  “Addressing challenges of funding women’s rights and gender equality”

Conference was held on 24-25 May 2010 in Bishkek. The conference was planned to be held in April 2010. Due to the political turmoil and “revolution” in Kyrgyzstan in April 2010 we had to postpone the conference to the end of May 2010. A presentation of our research data was done to women’s NGOs, State and donors representatives during the conference on «Challenges of funding women’s rights and gender equality» with participants from all women’s network members from all Kyrgyzstan provinces, state and donors.

 

Discussion of challenges of funding women’s rights and gender equality in Kyrgyzstan with women’s NGOs, State bodies, donors and Development and lobbying of joint positions from women’s organizations on improving status of funding for women’s issues, women’s programs and women’s groups was done at the conference.

Conference  was held as part of the project supported by AWID.

Goals of the project were:

  1.  Discussion of challenges of funding women’s rights and gender equality in Kyrgyzstanwith women’s NGOs, State bodies, donors.
  2.  Development and lobbying of joint positions from women’s organizations on improving status of funding for women’s issues, women’s programs and women’s groups.

 

Research

Research was done on availability, sustainability, models of funding, level of donors’ outreach, donors priorities, access to core and program funding, flexibility, relations between women’s groups and donors.

 

During this project period Forum of women’s NGOs of  Kyrgyzstan worked on “Doing research on funding challenges for women’s issues, gender equality and women’s organizations”

  •  We have been working on the Research methodology: we designed questionnaires to women’s groups in Kyrgyzstan, to donors’ representatives in Kyrgyzstan; Questions for in-depth interview were developed, we designed brainstorming sessions.
  • Communication with women’s groups, donors, state representatives was started regarding challenges of funding women’s rights and gender equality; we discussed and disseminated questionnaires to women’s groups in Kyrgyzstan, to donors, scheduling meetings with donors, women’s NGOs.
  • Conducting research: We have been collected data on donors, financial resources available for women’s groups, models of funding, level of donors’ outreach, donors priorities, access to core and program funding, flexibility, relations between women’s groups and donors, are still collecting filled questionnaires both from NGO and donors, started analysis of the collected data.  In depth interviews were done with several donors, state officials and numerous women’s NGOs.
  • Brainstorming session with women’s NGOs were done on models of funding, level of donors’ outreach, donors priorities, access to core and program funding, flexibility, relations between women’s groups and donors, sustainability. We organized several discussion round tables in provinces in August and October.

The project allowed getting identification of common problems, of recommendations for improvement of access to funding and financial resources for women’s issues and women’s organizations.

Collected data, interviews, held discussions prove that development of strong country and wide women’s movement seriously depends among other factors on the funding. There is a need in substantial advocacy and lobbying of creating sustainable resources for women’s groups all over the country. Many women’s groups stop functioning, limit activities and programs due to lack of or insufficient funding. So in other words improving of the funding will contribute to strengthening of women’s movement.

Forum of women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan initiated multi stakeholders’ dialogue based on analysis and recommendations that with a purpose of mobilization of funds for women’s movement in Kyrgyzstan.

Outcome of the project as Creation of a multi stakeholders’ dialogue on funding of women’s issues and NGOs and networks, opening of new and strengthening of the old funding opportunities, translation of general commitments from donors and state to fund gender equality into more concrete, sustainable, open and time bound commitments was reached. Discussion and development of a mechanism of funding women’s movement with women’s NGOs, State and donors happened at the conference and preparation to the conference.

 

We really consider this project as very helpul in making an issue of finances for women’ NGOs a part of joint women’s NGOs agenda and move locally to making practical steps to change status quo in financing women’s NGOs and women’s issues.  Development of recommendations was alsp a part of the movement building process.

 

We work now for the follow up so that continued multi stakeholders’ dialogue would be bettering financial stability of women’s organizations and increasing access for funding for women’s issues. We also include recommendations from the research to the national and international lobbying process on improving aid to countries.

 

One year after AWID 2008 Forum, after participation at AWID’s two workshops on funding women’s movement and challenges, and during the project research implementation our vision of approach to challenges of funding women’s rights and gender equality is further stranegthened and now in the end of 2009 we are even more sure that this important issue should be in women’s movement agenda and women’s groups should take initiatives and be more pro-active in addressing  these challenges and  develop partnerships in order to overcome these challenges. Forum of women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan is convinced that the idea generated at AWID Forum in 2008 is meeting needs.

 

Development of strong women’s movement depends among other factors on the funding: availabuility, susstainability, models of funding, level of donors’ outreach, donors priorities, access to core and program funding, flexibility, relations between women’s groups and donors, etc. So in othjer words improving of the funding will contribute to strengthening of women’s movement.

 

Creation of a multistakehoders dialogue on funding of women’s issues and NGOs and networks, opening of new and strengthening of the old funding opportunities, translation of general commitments from donors and state to fund gender equality into more concrete, sustainable, open and time bound commitments. Discussion and development of a mechanism of funding women’s movement with women’s NGOs, State and donors.

 

 

Open Forum for CSO Development Effectiveness, 3-5 April 2010, Bishkek, “Altyn Saray”

The consultation process and political context

Kyrgyzstan is a presidential republic. Parliament was elected on political parties’ lists in 2007. Three political parties were represented there.

Kyrgyzstan is recognized as a country with quite good level of political will in relation to the taking various commitments. But political will is not supported by programs of commitments’ implementation.  In October2009 in Kyrgyzstan there was a reformation of the political and all state bodies’ reformation. In the result all coordination financial flows was allocated in a new body – CADII. Very vague responsibilities between stakeholders for country development were divided. Political turbulence is high.  Opposition was very active.  Just after the workshop the opposition took state power. All branches of power stopped working. For the coming six months a temporary Government is formed, Parliament, President, presidential administration,Constitution Courtare not functioning. New country Constitution, Elections Code will be adopted by Referendum in summer 2010.  CSOs are recognized by the new temporary government and are invited to various political arenas and discussions of future of executive and legislative systems.

 

Positive or negative aspect of the consultation

Positive aspects of the consultation:

  1. Very diverse CSOs from all country provinces were present at   the CSO-only part of the consultation (women’s NGOs, CBOs, rural organizations, human rights organizations, trade union, youth organizations, media NGOs, etc.)
  2. Very high level of participants’ engagement into dialogue.
  3. Level of consensus building and ownership of the process.
  4. Bottom up approach in development of principles, indicators, recommendations.
  5. Open, participatory, vibrant and inclusive dialogue between various diverse CSOs.
  6. High level of resource people.
  7. Very good facilitation.
  8. High level of compliance with OF format.
  9. Results are designed: agreed principles, indicators, set of standards for enabling environment.
  10. Excellent organizational process: all group discussions’ results were shown on screen from computers, support team worked smoothly,
  11. Multi-stakeholder dialogue took place with participants from State, donors and business sectors.
  12. Preparatory work of the Core group.
  13. Location: all meetings were in the hotel where participants stayed.
  14. High level of openness of the preparatory process: all resource materials were sent to all participants and invited participants.
  15. Media coverage of the event.
  16. Excellent cooperation among CSOs at the third day
  17. Focused dialogue at the third day on agreed positions and questions
  18. Difficulties at the start of discussions among CSOs on the understanding of concept of effectiveness, indicators were overcome.
  19. Participants’’ kit included not only translated outreach tool and resources speeches, but background materials as PD, AAA, Monterey Consensus, power point presentations from October 2008 conference on AAA and PD, international CSOs positions.
  20. Participants received translated outreach tool before the Open Forum.
  21. Agreement to consider this dialogue as a starting point but not a separate individual activity.
  22. In small groups participants were divided into groups representing CSOs, the state, donors, and the general population, to decide on what parameters for CSO development effectiveness they would like to see

Negative aspects of the consultation:

  1. Low level of representation from real decision-makers from State and donors’ side.
  2. Low level of preparation from side of State and donors, demonstrated in the lack of responses to various questions related to implementation of AAA.
  3. Lack of time on development of the finalized framework of CSOs effectiveness.
  4. Proposed minimum standards, guidelines for strengthening the enabling external environment for CSOs was not reached at the multi-stakeholder dialogue

 

Key issues discussed

During the first two days of the Open Forum at CSOs only discussion the following issues got major focus: Dimensions CSO development effectiveness: Parameters of civil society development effectiveness, Identifying the most important principles of CSO development effectiveness based on the experience of Kyrgyzstan CSOs, their Indicators, guidelines, and mechanisms. Enabling environment for the activities of CSOs inKyrgyzstan, Key outcomes and recommendations for other stakeholders.

During the third days of the Open Forum at the multi-stakeholder dialogue discussion was focused on CSO development effectiveness principles and guidelines, ways to strengthen the recognition and voice of CSOs as development actors and the elements of an enabling environment. A set of minimum standards and guidelines for creating an enabling environment for CSOs; state’s and donors’ plans of actions  as follow up and implementation of the AAA were discussed in relation of creation of  an enabling environment for CSOs development and  as development actors.

Efforts were done to promote the concept of development effectiveness with other development stakeholders.

 

Summarise particularly important issues that emerged from the discussion (e.g. different views among different types of CSOs, any differing views relating to a gender dimension of CSO development effectiveness, tone of multi-stakeholder dialogue – if applicable — etc.)

Issue of Transparency and accountability was one of the most important.

Such principle as Commitment to mission got diverse opinions- whether to consider it as a principle or not. During discussion, the point was raised that it is impractical to suggest that employees and volunteers should be remembering to remain true to the organisation’s mission, in the face of day-to-day challenges.

Diversity opinions to the issues of professionalism of CSOs – finally agreed upon as leadership and professionalism.  Some participants argued that as civic activists, we should be professional, while others argued that ‘professionalism’ should be replaced by ‘competency’, to reflect the fact that many active in civil society are not professionals, but are nevertheless extremely competent and effective in what they do.   This lead on to reflections on who a ‘professional’ actually is (is it someone with a qualification?  A good track record?), and suggestions that what was actually needed was a point listing ‘leadership and knowledge of what you do.  Finally, the group compromised on ‘leadership and professionalism’.

All participants agreed that gender equality is a principle. It was reiterated that no CSO is going to be effective if discriminatory practices are dominant within the CSOs.

Differentiation between principles, dimensions, indicators.

Issues of indicators was a subject of debate: should CSOs ask for indicators or create own indicators and value of indicators. Finally all agreed that indicators are  are not there for other people to measure us, they are there for us to be able to measure and evaluate ourselves.

Participants found it difficult to work out what is an indicator, what is a mechanism, and how to measure these rather abstract ideas.  In relation to the principle of independence, they had decided that the most important thing was autonomy in decision-making, as laid out in agreed guidelines, rules, and the organisation’s strategic plan.  In regard to social justice, it is important to consider how what you are doing will impact on particular groups, such as women, those with disabilities, and children.

Participants had also found it very difficult to come up with indicators, especially for to measure ‘solidarity’.

Tone of multi-stakeholder dialogue was constructive, based  on quite good preparatory work of participants during the first two consultations days and joint attempts of CSOs to focus the dialogue on agreed CSOs effectiveness framework. It is important to note that State, donors and business participants were not ready to such focused discussion and probable expected rather individual appeals to them for support. They were not ready to keep dialogue on this issue,

 

Summary of the most important ideas on CSO development effectiveness from participants in relation to the key issues addressed (please distinguish between the CSO-only part of the consultation and the multi-stakeholder dialogue if applicable)

At the CSO-only part of the consultation the following most important ideas in relation to the key issues were raised:

On dimensions CSO development effectiveness: Following much discussion, these were then synthesized into one list: transparency, competency, Sustainability, relationship with state structures, independence, promotion of constitutional rights of citizens.

 

In identifying the most important principles of CSO development effectiveness participants developed list of principles based on the experience of Kyrgyzstan CSOs,

Participants stressed that CSOs should be politically impartial, and that they should not represent the interests of anyone but their members and beneficiaries.

 

Discussion of CSOs’ development effectiveness indicators, guidelines, and mechanisms gave participants a unique chance to reflect themselves as development actors. An idea of a framework of CSOs development effectiveness was much supported as a unifying platform for further dialogues with other development stakeholders.  In general discussions led to development of the agreed framework for the initiation of the multi-stakeholders dialogue.

 

At the multi-stakeholder dialogue the following most important ideas in relation to the key issues were raised: CSO development effectiveness principles and guidelines, ways to strengthen the recognition and voice of CSOs as development actors and the elements of an enabling environment. A set of minimum standards and guidelines for creating an enabling environment for CSOs; state’s and donors’ plans of actions  as follow up and implementation of the AAA were discussed in relation of creation of  an enabling environment for CSOs development and  as development actors.

Efforts were done to promote the concept of development effectiveness with other development stakeholders

 

From the CSO-only part of the consultation: participants identified external factors determining enabling environment, such as legal norms, charity laws, donors’ attitude and grant making approaches; and internal factors such as CSOs’ capacity,

 Among key challenges identified included the following: existing level of legislation related to CSOs (Laws on NGOs, on peaceful assemblies, on religion, on TV and radio); selectivity or favouratims in work, in partnership with CSOs; pressure related on the activities of CSOs; decision-making without taking into account of opinions and recommendations form CSOs. False understanding of charity; lack of CSOs’ effectiveness on changes of donors’, state’s and business’ policies. Lack of resources and of information about CSOs, lack of trust form business to CSOs. Lack of tax benefits for business that support CSOs.

Participants grouped key challenges into funding, tax regime, political environment,

 

Points raised in the discussion included: the need for donors to focus on effectiveness in their evaluation of programmes working with CSOs; issues over ownership of data produced during research projects commissioned by donors; the need for donor organizations to harmonize their policies on cross-cutting themes, such as gender equality; lack of trust between the business sector and CSOs; Presence of stereotypes regarding CSOs. Donors are selective in the work, partnership with CSOs, Pressure connected to the activities of CSOs, Decisions taken without consultation with CSOs.

Lack of good level of Involvement of CSOs in monitoring, evaluation, decision-making and implementation at all levels. Participants prepared an agreed list of recommendations  to the State, donors and business sector on these challenges.

From the multi-stakeholder dialogue:

CSOs presented recommendations to overcome challenges to the State, donors and business sector. Reactions from them were in general positive, but lacked concrete responses to CSOs recommendations.

  • All participants from State, donors and business sector agreed that CSOs face challenges.
  • Member of the Parliament was very positive and concrete in her response to uphold democratic legislation relating to freedom of speech, association, access to information.
  • Commitments to realization of the National Plan of Action in relation to gender issues, Realization and improvement of mechanisms for common policies and cooperation with CSOs

 

Donors agreed that there is a need in better and effective consultation with CSOs during the development of programs in order to fully take into account the local context and the real needs of the community; A need in Support to institutional development of CSOs was partially agreed.

Business sector participants agreed that there is a need in corporate social responsibility.

Questions

Gulnara Derbisheva, Member of the Jogorku Kenesh – national Parliament

  • There certainly needs to be greater cooperation and engagement between CSOs and elected government
  • Legislation relating to non-commercial organisations and to tax law does need to be reviewed, and CSOs should be part of that process
  • In terms of implementing legislation relating to gender, with support from Soros and others we have been monitoring the implementation of the anti-discrimination law, and we’ve learned from that that it’s not really working
  • But parliament and government are now more open to discussion of this issue, and to engagement with civil society

 

Analysis and recommendations

  1. Protection and promotion of human rights –effective and sustainable development is not possible without active participation of citizens of their own civil, economic and other rights.
  2. Civic participation in resolving socially significant issues — effective and sustainable development of State is not possible without confident, active citizens, capable to collectively impact on resolving their problems
  3. Gender approach –gender approach in planning actions and development of organization.  Rights, opportunities and responsibilities don’t depend on gender.
  4. Commitment to mission
  5. Influence over decision-making at all levels, according to the priorities contained in the National Programs of Development
  6. Transparency and accountability — Transparency and accountability to significant environment. Important element of the system of responsibilities between citizens and institutions in the development process.
  7. Cooperation and partnership with other development actors — Cooperation and equal partnership with other development actors; aside of the direct  services delivery CSOs have the right and capable to play wider roles in development.
  8. Leadership and professionalism – Capacity and professionalism.  As a reflection of the right to play wider roles in development.
  9. Legitimacy – Majors participants of development recognize existence and activities of CSOs.
  10. Results-driven – Orientation on results. Building of positive development and sustainable results is more important, then issues of management of services delivery.
  11. Independence-
  12. Social justice – Both  in planning and in actions there should be reflection of differences in opportunities, capacities and needs of subjects and objects of development.
  13. Solidarity with other development actors according to the scope and capacity of the CSO

 

Suggested guidelines for implementing agreed principles of CSO development effectiveness  with a short narrative describing the rationale for the guideline and how it relates to a given principle in the given context.

Mechanisms

 1. Protection and promotion of human rights

System of management or decision-making: general meeting of members, Board of directors, staff meetings, internal situation of the CSO, ethical code, internal order of the organisation, style of management, labour agreements, consideration of national legislation

  • Mandate, rules that have been developed, confirmed and adopted, policies and guidelines

2. Civic participation in resolving socially significant issues 

  • Participation of CSOs in forums, hearings, working groups, general councils, committees.
  • Public addresses, use of media, etc.
  • Social expertise

3. Gender approach

  • Flexible working
  • Consideration of family responsibilities
  • Consideration of the impact of the programme on men and women

4. Commitment to mission?????

5.  Influence on decision-making according to the priorities of the national development programme at all levels

6.  Transparency and accountability

7. Financial transparency

  • Dissemination of reports in the media, on the internet
  • Website, general meeting of members

8. Transparency in programme activities

  • Establishment of newspapers
  • Provision of information to beneficiaries
  • Annual forum of CSOs

9. Cooperation and partnership with other development actors

  • State social councils at all levels
  • Change to legislation
  • Coordinated advice resulting from open agreement

10. Leadership and professionalism

  • Questionnaires
  • Monitoring
  • Survey of the population
  • Training

11. Legitimacy

  • Organisational development

12. Results-driven

  • Monitoring and evaluation
  • Analysis of work

13. Independence

  • Active involvement of all in formulating opinions, recommendations

14. Social justice

  • Assessment of needs at different levels
  • Proper use at different levels

15. Solidarity with other development actors, according to the scope and capacity of the CSO

  • Effectiveness of rapid reaction procedures (governed by internal and external documents)
  • Monitoring and evaluation of programme development

 

Guidelines for implementing agreed principles of CSO development effectiveness

  1. Protection and promotion of human rights

System of management or decision-making

general meeting of members, Board of directors, staff meetings, internal situation of the CSO, ethical code, internal order of the organisation, style of management, labor agreements, consideration of national legislation

NONE

2. Civic participation in resolving socially significant issues  

NONE

3.      Gender approach

NONE

4. Commitment to mission ?????

5.      Influence on decision-making according to the priorities of the national development programme at all levels

6.      Transparency and accountability

  • Commitment to mission, goals, programmes
  •  Compliance of national legislation to international obligations

Finance transparency

a.      Tax code

Transparency in programme activities

b.      The CSO’s mission

7.      Cooperation and partnership with other development actors

  1.  Memorandums
  2. Agreements
  3. Resolutions

8.      Leadership and professionalism
9.      Legitimacy

  • CSOs related laws
  • Manuals
  • By-laws
  • Availability of evidence, presence of many people, registration in applicable structures

10.  Results-oriented

  • Implementation of assigned tasks (quantitative and qualitative data), achieved goals, staff

11.  Independence

  • Who makes decisions (organs of management), financial independence, strategic decisions

12.  Social justice

  • Consideration of groups marginalized by their physical location

13.  Solidarity with other development actors according to the scope and capacity of the CSO

  • Declarations of memorandum, agreement, and so forth
  • Ethical code
  • Implementation of common goals

 

Participants’ Suggested indicators for agreed principles

1.      Protection and promotion of human rights

  • Presence o internal regulations of procedure for the protection and promotion of the interests of members and staff belonging to the organisation:  Charter, Internal policies, internal regulations governing relationships, ethical code, regulations for resolving conflict, policies relating to accountability, and other documents
  • System of management or decision-making (general meeting of members, Board of directors, staff meetings, internal by-laws of the CSO, ethical code, internal order of the organisation, style of management, labour contract,, consideration of national legislation)

2.      Civic participation in resolving socially significant issues

  • Readiness, ability of the CSO to participate in discussing and decision-making to resolve socially significant issues at all levels.
  • Ability of the CSO to maintain links with the community and public.

3.      Gender approach

  • Consideration of gender interests in internal policies.
  • Gender mainstreaming in all programme planning, monitoring, and evaluation.

4.      Influence over decision-making at all levels, according to the priorities contained in the National Programme of Development

  • No indicators are worked out

5. Transparency  and accountability 

Accountability

  • Number of annual reports
  • Quantity of enabling opportunities
  • Organizational audit
  • Number of references

Financial transparency 

  • Number of CSOs presenting reports to the tax office, social security office divided by the number of registered CSOs
  • Number of CSOs and published reports about public events divided by the number of registered CSOs
  • Number of CSOs who are accessible to society divided by the number of registered CSOs.

Transparency of Programme activities

  • Number of CSOs who are accessible to for society divided by the number of registered CSOs.
  • Number of CSOs who have published reports about their activities on the internet, in the media, and to beneficiaries.

6.      Cooperation and partnership with other development actors

  • Number of local projects
  • Number of supporting partners among all other development actors (state, international partners, business, beneficiaries, other CSOs)
  • Number of combined achieved results
  • Number of CSOs on the side of the state, business structure (Social contracts in the budget)
  • Satisfaction of beneficiaries using the services of the CSO.
  • Number of independent legal evaluations of national development programmes undertaken by CSOs of national development programmes

7. Leadership and professionalism

  • Number of achieved results according to programme activities
  • Certificates
  • Work experience
  • Number of leaders from CSOs among political leaders

8.      Legitimacy:

  • Certificate of official registration
  • Representation of many people

9.  Results-driven

  • Achievement of stated goals ( qualitative and quantitative data), reached objectives, prepared staff)

10. Independence

  • Who is making decisions (governing body)
  • Financial independence
  • Autonomy of strategic decisions – how many strategic decisions are made independently of state and donor policy.
  • The CSO’s mandate
  • Processes of decision-making (how decisions are taken – general meeting of members, how many times a year)

11.  Social justice

  •  Taking into account of marginalization and of  territorial belonging

12.  Solidarity with other development actors according to the scope and capacity of the CSO

  • Number of communicative spaces (alliances, union, etc)
  • Number of  agreed joint decisions (positive and challenging ones)
  • Systematic consultations and dialogues
  • Implementations of adopted laws

13. Commitment to mission

Indicators are not worked out

 

Based on the multi-stakeholder dialogue, identify proposed minimum standards or guidelines for strengthening the enabling external environment for CSOs, with a short explanation of the issue in the enabling environment addressed by the standard (this should also clearly indicate the stakeholder group to which standards or guidelines apply: donors, governments, local authorities etc.)

It is not possible to identify minimum standards or guidelines for strengthening the enabling external environment for CSOs based on the multi-stakeholder dialogue, because state, donors and business participants were not very ready to discuss them from concrete planning perspectives. They can be identified only based on discussion among CSOs only. Although some not from CSOs participants were expressing their appreciation of such framework with set of standards. Dialogue was considered as a step to initiate discussions on a set of minimum standards and guidelines for creating an enabling environment for CSOs from CSOs perspectives:

1)      Recognition of CSOs

2)      Promotion of CSOs’ voice

3)      Development of CSOs’ capacity

4)      External relations of CSOs

5)      Provision of long-term funding for CSOs

6)      Involvement of CSOs to dialogues

 

The recommendations were:

To the State:

  • Uphold democratic legislation relating to freedom of speech, association, access to information, and so forth
  • Keeping the liberal law ‘On non-commercial organizations’
  • Improvement of tax legislation relating to non-commercial organizations
  • Take control over the realization of the National Plan of Action in relation to gender issues
  • Realization and Improvement of mechanisms for common policies and cooperation with CSOs

To donors:

  • Consultation with CSOs during the development of programmes in order to fully take into account the local context and the real needs of the community
  • Support institutional development of CSOs
  • Consideration of local legislation in regard to determination of funding conditions

 To the business sector

  • Cultivate (develop) corporate social responsibility
  • In setting dialogue take into account the non-commercial, social orientation of activity of CSOs.
  •  Proposed good practices for mechanisms that assure CSO accountability and effectiveness or commentary on how to strengthen CSO accountability

 Transparency and accountability were considered as of key principles and participants shared various examples of good practices from CSOs experience. Examples were considered as good if transparency and accountability was to constituencies. Although it was noted that to ensure and set a good practice CSOs need transparency and accountability means and capacity. Some participants stressed financial accountability whereas majority included on programs, activities and results. Some CSOs used for financial transparency

dissemination of reports in the media, on the internet, on website, at general meeting of members. Others stressed such mechanisms that are partially used by CSOs as publications in newspapers for  dissemination of information to beneficiaries, others suggested accountability to peers at annual forums of CSOs. There was no one example of good practice with fully working and well resourced transparency mechanism.

Additional information: for instance, areas where common understanding emerged and areas where there were widely divergent views

Participants suggested continuing this process: “We don’t have any influence over donors and their undoing, but without civil society, the donors are nothing.  It’s already been five years since the Paris Declaration, but nothing has changed.  We need to go back to our villages and tell people about the Accra Programme of Action.  And the organizing committee of this workshop should work with donors. Number of participants Total 54 participants: 36 participants from CSOs, 5 from State, 2 from business, 11 from donors.

 

 

Implementation in 2008

1. Regional Central Asian consultation workshop of civil society: «ACCRA AGENDA FOR ACTION, civil society organizations and aid effectiveness», 7-8 October 2008, Bishkek, “Altyn Saray” hotel and

2. Regional Central Asian multistakeholders’ consultation workshop

«Aid effectiveness и further actions on aid effectiveness  and AAA implementation», held on the 9 October 2008 in Hotel Silk Road

Forum of Women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan (Forum) has organized two workshops on Aid effectiveness и further actions on aid effectiveness  and AAA implementation at Central Asian level in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan.

Location:Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

Date: 6-9 October 2008

 Summary

This project was aimed at organization and holding the regional Multi-stakeholders’ Consultation Workshop with the participation of CSOs, Government, multilateral institutions, donors, and international NGOs.   This consultation was convened within the context of initiating the process of GO-CSO policy dialogue on the implementation and review of the Paris Declaration, AAA and other issues on aid effectiveness; of initiating the process of dialogue on CSO aid effectiveness issues, and identifying issues of immediate concern, and discuss issues and promote good practices; and, identifying issues of future concern, including steps for further action.

CSOs and multi stakeholders’ consultations on aid effectiveness, financing for development in the context of Central Asia were held in Bishkek on 7-9 October 2008.

This event was organized the Forum of Women’s NGOs of  Kyrgyzstan,  IBON International and the Reality of Aid Network, members of the international Advisory Group on Civil Society and Aid Effectiveness as an NGO initiative for aid effectiveness on further implementation of the Paris declaration and Accra Agenda for Actions, adopted at the HLF III on the Paris Declaration in September2008 in Ghana..

 

Major themes for consultation are Post Accra Aid Effectiveness, institutionalizing policy dialogue spaces, enabling environment for CSOs, strengthening of understanding and recognizing roles of  CSOs in aid agenda, CSO effectiveness process, democratic ownership processes, challenges for implementation of the AAA and challenges for implementation of the AAA on CSOs .

The project showed that majority of CSOs  in  Central Asia lack information  and knowledge on FFD and aid  effectiveness inCentral Asiaand at the international level. This project was on time, immediately after the Accra HLF, and it is enabling CSOs to start engagement, so that CSOs could have a chance to start creating dialogues and discuss aid  effectiveness and management for development results. It was a significant learning process, with discussing, sharing, networking and planning components.

Project was focused on preparation and organization of three days workshop on regional Central Asian discussion of aid effectiveness with participants from CSOs, GOs and donors from the region of Central Asia. This meeting should be seen as part of a longer-term process of regional dialogue to address the full range of civil society and aid effectiveness questions as Post Accra Forum.

Total participants – 35: CSOs -25, State — 3, Donors — 5, INGOs – 3.

 

 Part 1 — goal and objectives

  • Organization and holding the regional Multi-stakeholders’ Consultation Workshop with the participation of CSOs, Government, multilateral institutions, donors, and international NGOs.

Project’s objective is:

  1. Initiating the process of GO-CSO policy dialogue on the implementation and review of the Paris Declaration and other issues on aid effectiveness;
  2. Initiating the process of dialogue on CSO aid effectiveness issues, and identifying issues of immediate concern, and
  3. Discussion of  issues and promoting of  good practices;
  4. Recognition of roles of civil society in the aid effectiveness in Central Asia.
  5. Identifying issues of future concern, including steps for further action

Themes of the workshops

  • Aid effectiveness issues and concerns in Central Asia (implementation of the Paris Declaration, AAA, issues of tied aid; conditionality; and debt, grants, and the debt burden, harmonization, alignment, and mutual accountability, CSOs’ concerns to implement AAA),
  • The roles of civil society in the aid effectiveness and voice of CSOs, and the applicability of the AAA on CSOs, providing an enabling environment for CSOs, CSO accountability and national coordination,
  • Best practices and exchange information on the implementation of the commitments made and agreements reached at the International Conference for Financing for Development.
  • Further Strategies after Accra HLF and  ways forward.  

 

Part 2 — Two workshops at Central Asian level in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

Two workshops were held during three days: Regional Central Asian consultation workshop of civil society: «ACCRA AGENDA FOR ACTION, civil society organizations and aid effectiveness», 7-8 October 2008 and Regional Central Asian multistakeholders’ consultation workshop «Aid effectiveness  and further actions on aid effectiveness  and AAA implementation». 

 

I day — Post Accra Aid Effectiveness Forum. Major themes of the day were: Review of Development Assistance AAA and results of the HLF III on the Paris Declaration), Modalities of aid effectiveness reform, Analysis of  the AAA and areas for implementation, Central Asian CSOs experiences in the process of development  and on aid effectiveness.

II day — CSO Development Effectiveness Process. Major themes of the day were: Findings and Recommendations of the OECD/WP-EFF/DAC Advisory Group on Civil Society and Aid Effectiveness, Central Asian coalition building, and setting up a working group for the NGO coalition

 

The conference concept is based on the concept AG-sponsored consultations’ three outcomes:

  • Greater recognition of the diversity of roles played by CSOS and of their importance
  • An enriched understanding of aid effectiveness principles and considerations as they apply to the work of CSOs in development
  • Improved understanding of what constitutes good practice by civil society itself, by official donors and by developing-country governments.

Program has included presentations and discussions by Central Asian participants of the Aid effectiveness и further actions on aid effectiveness  and AAA implementation inCentral Asia.

 

Format: Input presentations, Panel Discussions, Case Studies, Open forum, Breakaway groups’ and their reports to Panel.

7-8 October CSOs consultation on aid effectiveness and AAA:

  • 7 October was devoted to Post Accra  and in the form of Aid Effectiveness Forum,
  • 8 October -  CSO Development Effectiveness Process.

9 October – multistakeholders’ consultation on aid effectiveness and AAA

 

 

    1. Regional Central Asian consultation workshop of civil society.  Post Accra Aid Effectiveness: «ACCRA AGENDA FOR ACTION, civil society organizations and aid effectiveness» 

      7-8 October 2008

 

Opening and introduction  of the first day of the Central Asian consultations among CSOs was done by Nurgul Djanaeva, Forum for Women’s NGOs, Kyrgyzstan, and Antonio Tujan, Chairperson, Reality of Aid Network.

Antonio Tujan Jr. made a  Report on the AAA and HLF III on the Paris Declaration. The objective of the report was to make an Overview of Development Assistance. Implementing Aid Effectiveness Commitments Post-Accra raised big interest among participants.

The following themes were presented and discussed: Aid and the right to development, Development cooperation and aid, Official Development Aid, Development Cooperation and Aid, Development Aid and Debt, Neocolonial debt crisis, Debt crisis and development finance

Aid relationship, Is aid achieving development? Neocolonial instrumentalisation of aid, Structural Adjustment Conditionality.

Central Asian NGO reports highlighted Central Asia, CSOs experiences in the process of development  and on aid effectiveness. Speakers were from well known CSOs of Central Asia: Director of the Kyrgyzstan NGO “Association of NGOs support centers” Aidar Mambetov, Association of NGOs support centres, Kyrgyzstan; Shahlo Juraeva, NGO “Jahon,» and Margarita Hegai, independent expert on CSOs “Limited access of CSOs to development programs design” Tajikistan; Dildora Alimbekova, Sharofat Tulaeva, Association of business women”aid effectiveness  in Uzbekistan”, Urkyz Ilieva, international ecological association of East Women, Challenges of financing of rural women, Kazakhstan

 

“Association of NGOs support centers” Aidar Mambetov, Association of NGOs support centres, Kyrgyzstan

Central Asian NGOs have started practicing open an accountability process of their work as development actors.  CSOs in Kyrgyzstan during many years work as development actors. Functions of  NGOs were changing during these years from watch dogs (MAG group), tracing aid and providing analytical comments and recommendations. Effectiveness of the work was lowered due to the lack of political will to listen to CSOs at the process of development of various national development programs (National strategy of sustainable development, CDF, CSDP). Kyrgyzstan leadership agreed for CSOs participation, but in reality it didn’t take into account their recommendations.  Partnership experience: how CSOs are ready for partnership? For example, national bank withdrew recently licenses from several non-state credit lines because they were not in fact during years submitting required reports. Recently inKyrgyzstan a law on social order was adopted by the Parliament. Questions arise: level of management and reporting of CSOs – reporting to State, beneficiaries. Is it effective? A survey among communities showed that population either don’t know NGOs or don’t trust them. New system of additional or alternative accounts are now in the discussion and implementation level in Kyrgyzstan, it was initiated by UN and Kyrgyzstan and it is the fistr such experience in Central Asia. In one year they will be able to show the economic contribution of CSOs to development of the country. Associaiton of NGOs support center started work on indexes. As for the AAA and its relation to CSO – articles 13 and 20 are relevant to us.

Tajikistan speakers, Shahlo Juraeva from NGO “Jahon” and Margarita Hegai  informed that aid is more oriented at humanitarian assistance. CSOs are parters in development of the country, but there is lack of open access to interrelations. Issues of corruption, debt, growth of prices, formal approach to gender equality, are challenges of development.

Uzbekistan NGOs have a very different situation fromKyrgyzstan andTajikistan – State has a restricting policy towards donors and they agree with such position of the State.  Now international organizations themselves implement their project inUzbekistan. they have their own system of funding. NGOs have State funding mechanism under the auspice of parliament – a special fund was set.  CSOs are not involved in the monitoring of State nor donors.

Open forum  gave participants the opportunity to discuss aid  effectiveness and CSOs experience and concerns. Nigora Gaparova from Association of Uzbekistan NGOs shared their experience of cooperation with government.  She spoke about Special Fund and Association of NGOs of Uzbekistan.

Kazakhstan participant, Urkyz Ilivea from international ecological association of East Women, spoke about challenges of financing of rural women. She shared their work experience and it showed how effective CSOs can be at rural and community levels. They work on program level, but not on project level. Urkyz Ilieva referred to articles 40 and 41. Experience of cooperation at international level on their products (sun dryers and sun collectors) attracted attention.  Experience of this NGO can be a good case of NGOs as development actor because they significantly contribute to bettering life of rural community and assist in reduction of poverty in sustainable way.  Besides in their province there is a fund of local communities was set up and it was the first experience inKazakhstan. This Fund was supported by private donors, such as Philip Morris,Eurasia foundation.Kazakhstan participants informed that they have similar comments to international donors in the region: lack of accountability to people, whereas they require accountability from CSOs.

 

Ensure meaningful participation by CSOs in the Accra HLF follow up and AAA implementation.

CSOs should be included in all the segments of the AAA implementation. CSOs perspectives must be part of the official discussions, including the monitoring of the AAA implementation.

The agenda for the state and donors’ meeting should open a space for groups which are often excluded from these processes. In particular, meaningful participation of women’s organizations in the whole follow up process, including through a roundtable on gender equality and aid effectiveness, is key to ensure that the voices, concerns and proposals of women are taken into account.

Antonio Tujan,  Jr. made an inputs  on Modalities of aid effectiveness reform – Paris Declaration and the AAA and beyond  and on Analysis of  the AAA and areas for implementation.  He has covered a series of issues: Is aid reducing poverty and achieving development? Aid management and delivery, Aid management and development impact, Paris declaration and donor commitments, CSO concerns, Accra HLF3 Taking Stock, Tied Aid, Conditionality, Redefining ownership, Alignment, Accountability, Other country demands, Development finance and ODA Advocacy.  Open forum  followed with rich discussion by participants.

 

Aid terms must be fairly and transparently negotiated with participation and accountability to people living in poverty and inequality. Donors and recipient governments should agree to base future aid relationship on transparent and binding agreements including clear commitments by donors on aid volumes and quality, with sanctions. In addition, it is vital that effective fiduciary mechanisms remain in place to ensure that aid money is spent for the purposes intended. These agreements should be independently monitored.

 

Analysis of  the AAA and areas for implementation was presented by Antonio Tujan Jr.  he focused on CSO demands towards AAA from the ISG position paper and commentary on AAA drafts: More substantive AAA debate, Aid and development effectiveness, Country systems and South/South cooperation, CSOs and Forward action and implementation.

 

Open forum  followed with rich discussion by participants. CSO urge for a stronger expression of commitments to untied aid. Donors should commit to expanding the agreement on untying aid to all countries, and all aid modalities (including food aid and technical assistance) and set up independently monitored targets for translating this commitment into practice. Another issue was raised by participants – attitude to consultants and international consultants. Now Central Asia has enough local and qualified consultants, and they should be invited for work under the technical assistance other aid forms to countries. Such local consultants have not only very high level of technical and professional expertise but they have additional value – they have local background and knowledge of the context.

Debt should be considered as non legitimate, because in many cases in was used not for the planned goals and target. This should be enough for debt cancellation.

 

The second day of the Central Asian consultations among CSOs  “CSO Development Effectiveness Process”.

 Antonio Tujan Jr. made an input on the CSOs and Aid Effectiveness. He has presented Synthesis of Findings and Recommendations of the OECD/WP-EFF/DAC Advisory Group on Civil Society and Aid Effectiveness.  Participants learnt about the Advisory Group of WP EFF on CSO and aid effectiveness, its mandate and roles of CSOs in the context of aid  effectiveness.


Follow up discussion  in the form of an open forum  was very fruitful. Participants have used these recommendations in their analysis of the CSOs role in aid  effectiveness process inCentral Asiaand how CSOs can  enrich PD and aid effectiveness. Discussion was focused on Recognition and Voice of CSOs, Broadening ownership definition towards democratic and local ownership , CSOs Effectiveness issues, Sustained multistakeholder processes at country level with collective action for priority areas, Piloting good practice, CSO Effectiveness process.

 Input was done by Roberto Pinauin, interntional programs manager from IBON on CSOs Aid Effectiveness — context, process and principles of CSO development effectiveness, work plan and progress report. It was followed by an open forum.   This presentation set out the background, origins, history, objectives and cornerstones of the CSO effectiveness process. Like donors and governments, civil society organisations (CSOs) have been working to improve the quality and impact of their work for many decades. Roberto Pinauin shared Cornerstones of the effectiveness agenda and Getting CSOs on board Accra Agenda for Action. In the AAA, donors and governments commit to: “Deepen our engagement with CSOs as independent development actors in their own right whose efforts complement those of governments and the private sector. We share an interest in ensuring that CSO contributions to development reach their full potential.”, “We welcome the CSOs’ proposal to engage with them in a CSO-led multistakeholder process to promote CSO development effectiveness.”, “We will work with CSOs to provide an enabling environment that maximizes their contributions to development.” With this regard a multitude of challenges appear. “For the first time there is a collective CSO commitment to address CSO effectiveness at a global level” – form An Open Forum for CSO Development Effectiveness – A Progress Report. Pinauin informed about the Open Forum and its plans (elaborate CSO effectiveness principles focusing on the  diverse roles of CSOs as development actors, build consensus based on national and regional activities and consultations, be an inclusive and multi-stakeholder process, managed and led by CSOs; need to be owned by CSOs from both the North and the South to be credible and relevant, especially take into account gender issues, focus on development effectiveness, not aid effectiveness. Roberto informed about the aim of this process. He told about a consensus for engaging in a political dialogue with donors and governments to address the needs for enabling environments for CSO effectiveness, based on the recognition of the distinct roles and voice of CSOs as development actors in their own right. He poske about driving forces and Global facilitation Group –GFG which is guiding the process and the composition of the GFG. He called for Central Asian participation — Your participation is crucial!

  Participants discussed role of CSOs regarding AAA, the conditions that enable them to play effective roles in development.

Donors and Central Asian  governments should support the conditions which are necessary to enable CSOs inCentral Asiato fulfill their roles in the development process. CSOs need legal frameworks and mechanisms which provide for freedom of association, the right to organise and participate in national decision-making processes, and a free and open media.  CSOs also need predictable long-term funding – donors should explore new modalities of support to provide this.

CSO are essential for creating a climate of social, political and economic change towards reducing poverty and inequalities and the fulfillment of human rights. Therefore it is vital to preserve their strategic role.

 

Participants discussed and support very actively an idea of creation of a Central Asian coalition building, and setting up country working groups for the NGO coalition. This session resulted in a decision to set up a coalition and country level working groups for coordinating involvement of CSOs in the process of implementation and monitoring of the PD and AAA.

 

Member of the Kyrgyzstan Parliament, Gulnara Derbisheva spoke on the role of parliament and her vision of the bettering aid  effectiveness.

 

Breakaway Workshops based on CSOs Effectiveness needs, Sustained multistakeholder processes at country level , were focused on planning for country processes and further action on enabling environment, national networks and partnerships, human rights and accountability to constituencies and links to the regional and international networks on the theme. Participants discussed how to create an effective and relevant independent monitoring and evaluation system for the Paris Declaration, AAA and their impact on development outcomes.

 

                        Groups come up with the following:

Create and sustain new multi-stakeholder mechanisms for holding governments and donors to account.

Multi-stakeholder mechanisms for holding governments and donors to account for the use of aid should be developed – these should be the real test of whether commitments to ‘mutual accountability’ are being met. They should be open, transparent and regular, with real room for citizens of Central Asian countries to hold their governments and donors to account and also CSOs themselves.

There is a need to continue an awareness raising process on the PD and AAA in the region for CSOs. There is a need to increase capacity building of CSOs to work effectively as partners in this process.

There is a need to build capacity of CSOs in relation to aid  effectiveness and AAA implementation. CSO Effectiveness process should be kept in CSOs agenda. Central Asian CSOs are interested in setting up a regional and country Open Forum will be an inclusive and multi-stakeholder process, which is managed and led by CSOs, and link its work with the Global Facilitation Group (GFG).

 

 

The third day was a Regional Central Asian multistakeholders’ consultation workshop

«Aid effectiveness и further actions on aid effectiveness  and AAA implementation»

 

 Antonio Tujan Jr. made a presentation of the AAA and its commitments. CSO demands towards AAA.

He stressed that the AAA implementation process should strive to end all donor-imposed policy conditions and practice of using aid with foreign and economic interests, priorities.  The AAA implementation mechanism should be set up and should set out a work-plan to achieve ambitious targets to simplify and reduce the overall number of conditions.

 

Sultan Ahmatov, head of the department of the Coordination Ministry of economic development and trade, Kyrgyzstan spoke on  “Harmonization of aid in Kyrgyzstan”. He, being a member of the coordination Council, shared goals and process on aid  effectiveness in Kyrgyzstan. He reminded that MDGs with its 8 development goals are major goals. One of the issues is harmonization of the aid to developing countries. Harmonization and aid  effectiveness inKyrgyzstan: National Plan of Actions on harmonization of procedures of donors, review of the credit portfolio are going on inKyrgyzstan. Since 2006 orientation was on four priority areas: water supply to agricultural areas, healthcare system, education and roads. If in the beginning the review was under the WN, since 2008 this is done under the country leadership. Mid Term country development strategy (CDS) is designed for three years and new feature is that it is defining small number of priorities with financial resources. He reviewed and assessed it from the financing point of view. Currently there is a process of CDS review for the 2009-2011. All partners are involved and there is a work on involvement of the Parliament. Survey on aid  effectiveness is taking place and they see gaps and success. Survey of 2008 revealed a series of problems: accountability to whom and whose? Problem of accountability and coordination. Also inside the government procedures is a problem. Technical assistance in nowhere registered and reflected  in the approximate amount of 10-15 million of USD annually. This relates to the TA responsibility. Another problem is a need to widen trust of donors to the country. Problem of trust of donors – where is a place for CSOs? He informed that inKyrgyzstan a process of the AAA adaptation is going on.

 

Hursanmurod Mirzoev, senior advisor on legal issues to the president of Tajikistan shared history ofTajikistan and impact of civil war on development and also he highlighted  role of government in aid coordination inTajikistan.

 

Open forum was focused on:

Participants learnt that in Kyrgyzstan is going on. Participants were interested in the place for CSOs in the process of the AAA adaptation, in the adaptation mechanism and results, dates and ways. Another issue of interest was to whom this adapted version of the  AAA will be presented – to Parliament?

Participants were interested in the role of local governance role and role of local elected councils.

Several participants were interested in a mechanism of interrelation between stakeholders, especially with CSOs on further AAA implementation.  State representatives responded that cases of good support and relations exist. He expects constructive relations with NGOs. It would be useful to have a data base of CSOs, with thematic expertise and interest. Member of the local council asked about role of the local bodies. Response: it is not yet planned to transfer financial resources for local governance. But he sees role of locally elected bodies as aid flow controllers and monitors.

Participants suggested that they can unite on evaluation of results of development. A representative of the media center asked about AAA article 24. All participants discussed actively an issues of capacity within AAA and its implementation.

Ways of Creation of an effective and relevant independent monitoring and evaluation system for the Paris Declaration, AAA and their impact on development outcomes.

Ways of support to CSOs to strengthen their capacity. Participants agreed that more support is needed for the role of CSOs, including for their emerging efforts to increase their own accountability as well as their capacity as development actors.

 

Donors and Central Asian governments must adhere to the highest standards of openness and transparency.

Commitment to giving aid for poverty eradication and the promotion of human rights.

Donors must commit to give aid mostly to eradicate poverty and inequalities and to promote human rights.  They must end the practice of using aid for their own foreign and economic policy interests and priorities.

Participants discussed role of CSOs regarding AAA, CSOs Effectiveness issues, Sustained multistakeholder processes at country level.

TheAAAshould create a system of independent monitoring and evaluation of the PD and AAA at national and local levels.  At the regional level, new independent institutions will be needed to play this role, in order to hold donors to account for their overall performance. For example, a coordination council for Aid  effectiveness and development results.  At the national and local levels monitoring and evaluation should involve a range of stakeholders – including CSOs.

Monitoring and evaluation should also take much more account of the links between reforms in aid modalities and development outcomes and progress towards human rights.  The AAA should initiate work to further explore these links.  The AAA should also set out a working plan to develop a more comprehensive and participatory process, led by developing country partners, including Southern CSOs, for determining more appropriate indicators and measurements of aid effectiveness.  The 2010 review of the Paris Declaration commitments should be expanded to include the outcomes of this comprehensive assessment.

 

Panel discussion on challenges for implementation of the Acra Agenda for Action (AAA)


Dinara Djoldosheva, WB in Kyrgyzstan: Deputy to the Resident Representative from the World Bank, Dinara Djoldosheva, spoke on WB’s work in Kyrgyzstan and reminded that WB works with government. But she shared her position of CSOs role.  Their work with CSOs depend on the effectiveness level of CSOs, their proactiveness. It should defined where CSOs can be useful, may in monitoring. In the development and design of the program specially qualified people are needed.  WB gives to Kyrgyzstan agriculture 270 million USD.  Regarding harmonization role of CSOs may be in lobbying the law on procurement and monitoring of the law implementation.  She touched partners, issues of corruption. Participants got information  about the process of development  of the Joint Strategy of Aid to Kyrgyzstan with 7 partners. There is a plan on harmonization of procedures.  As for the AAA – nothing new in the process, but now there is going on a process of the adaptation of the AAA to Kyrgyzstan.  

 

Taru Kernisalo, European Commission in Kyrgyzstan spoke on participation of CSOs, possibilities of cooperation. 

 

Nurgul Djanaeva, Forum of Women’s NGOs of  Kyrgyzstan spoke on the women’s issues in the aid effectiveness process, highlighted major statements from Women’s Forum in Accra and of the Forum of Women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan. Gender equality should be seriously considered as one of the central issues in aid  effectiveness and management for development results.

 

UN in Kyrgyzstan,  Anastasiya Divinskaya shared UNIFEM  work  on gender equality and aid  effectiveness during the last years.

 

 

Open forum 

Ensure meaningful participation by CSOs in the Accra HLF follow up and AAA implementation in all the segments so that CSOs perspectives become a part of the official discussions, including the monitoring of the AAA implementation.

The agenda for the state and donors’ meeting should open a space for groups which are often excluded from these processes. In particular, meaningful participation of women’s organizations in the whole follow up process, including through a roundtable on gender equality and aid effectiveness, is key to ensure that the voices, concerns and proposals of women are taken into account.

 

Panel discussion on challenges for implementation of the AAA on CSOs  were focused on State, donors’ and CSOs commitments.  CSOs shared their vision of future multistakeholders cooperation.

 

Small group discussions on future strategies let to decision and agreements and were presented to state and donors later in the day. Most active engagement was from WB, European Commission. Major themes were around institutionalizing policy dialogue spaces, enabling environment for CSOs, CSO effectiveness process, democratic ownership processes.

 

Part 3 – Outcomes and further actions

All decisions are based on the need to involve wide CSOs in the region and in countries to the discussion of aid  effectiveness process, to set up a sustainable mechanism of consultation and cooperation. Participants agreed that the centrality of poverty reduction, gender equality, human rights and social justice should be recognized and ensured in the aid effectiveness process. All process of AAA implementation and monitoring should follow not only aid effectiveness, but more achieving development results. In order to reach this, CSOs should be involved.

In the result of the workshops the following was achieved:

  • Better understanding of the applicability and limitations of the Paris Declaration, Accra Agenda for Actions for addressing issues of aid effectiveness of importance to CSOs, including how CSOs can better contribute to aid effectiveness and achieving development results.
  • The process of GO-CSO policy dialogue on the implementation and review of the PD, AAA and other issues on aid effectiveness was initiated;
  • the process of dialogue on CSO aid effectiveness issues, and identifying issues of immediate concern was initiated, and
  • Discussion of  issues and promoting of  good practices was initiated;
  • Better recognition of roles of civil society in the aid effectiveness inCentral Asiawas achieved.
  • Issues of future concern, including steps for further action was identified.
  • Development of recommendations to all stakeholders.

 

Recommendations

  • All reports related to aid to publish in countries
  • Government to make regular report to the National Parliament
  • To do work on advocacy on donors
  • To work on the Central Asian CSOs platform and link to the reality of Aid network
  • Creation of councils on development at various levels in countries with the aim to control aid  effectiveness, and AAA implementation. Members of such councils may also CSOs.
  • Advocate for creation or strengthening enabling environment for partnership
  • Donors should report, meet with CSOs and discuss at early stages  — before the projects start.

 

Decisions and agreements and further actions of CSOs of Central Asia, gathered at the workshop, reached during these events:

  1. Paris Declaration, Accra Agenda for Actions have big importance to CSOs and CSOs are interested and will be engaged in follow up process of the PD review in Accra and AAA implementation.
  2. CSOs of Central Asia, gathered at the workshop, share and support CSOs recommendations, which were prepared for the Accra HLF 3,  regarding the aid  effectiveness and AAA implementation.
  3. CSOs of Central Asia, gathered at the workshop, will start awareness raising process on Paris Declaration, Accra Agenda for Actions and on the aid  effectiveness issues in their countries and set up CSOs and multistakeholders coordinating units.
  4. CSOs of Central Asia, gathered at the workshop, will unite their efforts at Central Asian level around making aid more effective and oriented for development results.
  5. The process of GO-CSO — donors policy dialogue on the implementation and review of the PD, AAA and other issues on aid effectiveness will be continued and strengthened in Central Asia  and development of further  country plans will be done (dissemination process, communication focal points with Forum of Women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan, setting up a Central Asian list serve, setting up coordination or ??? councils, meetings with state and donors representatives). This includes segments of relevant capacity building of CSOs, local governance and Parliaments.
  6. Development of Central Asian plan of actions later after wide consultation in countries with all stakeholders will be continued.

 

 In countries of Central Asia there should be set up a multi stakeholders’ coordination mechanism with an institutionalized space for CSOs systematic, meaningful and sustainable engagement in all the segments so that CSOs perspectives become a part of the official discussions, including the monitoring of the AAA implementation. This is needed for reaching the following:

Recommended that Donors and Central Asian governments must adhere to the highest standards of openness and transparency.

 Create an effective and relevant independent monitoring and evaluation system for the Paris Declaration, AAA and their impact on development outcomes.

Make efforts in countries that a new multi-stakeholder mechanisms for holding governments and donors to account is set up so that state and donors are giving aid for poverty eradication and the promotion of human rights.

 

Participants

Total participants – 35.

CSOs -25

Donors – 5: senior officer, deputy of the resident representative of the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, officer in charge of accountability and transparency of the Soros Foundation, Attache, project manager of European Commission in Kyrgyzstan.

State representatives of Kyrgyzstan- 3 participants

INGOs – 3: IBON, Reality of Aid, UNIFEM.

State – 4: National coordinator of the aid, head of  department of aid coordination, Ministry of economic development and trade, Kyrgyzstan; member of the national Parliament of Kyrgyzstan; member of the local council, Kyrgyzstan; Head of the department, Ministry of foreign affairs, Tajikistan. 

Participants from Central Asia

CSOs from Kyrgyzstan- 13

Kazakhstan  CSOs — 3

Tajikistan CSOs — 4,  and State – 1

Uzbekistan CSOs – 5.

 

 

 

FFD and aid  effectiveness from women’ perspectives

 Nurgul Djanaeva, Forum of Women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan, is making presentation in Hanoi at consultations on aid  effectiveness

 

 Report 1 by NURGUL DJANAEVA (FORUM FOR WOMEN’S NGOs)  at the meeting on Aid effectiveness, 9 October 6, 2007

 

Kyrgyzstan case study on harmonization, alignment, mutual accountability

From Forum of Women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan the issue of the aid effectiveness has a special meaning. Forum of Women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan started in the end of 2005 and now working on our program on 50 women leaders’ capacity development for the next parliamentary election. One aspect of this capacity development program includes women’s capacity on good governance with management of country’s financial resources. As future decision-makers they are learning how to make aid more effective. Women need to understand and apply the gained knowledge.

I have followed a concept developed by CSOs and found this frame quite useful.

 

Interpretation of aid, it expected outcomes

Aid is aimed at what? Is goal of the aid to get country out of poverty or assist in development of wealthy economy, based on independence?

Countries want to harmonize aid effectiveness in the framework of MDGs implementation. This means that effectiveness should be measured from this perspective. What UN site ways about MDGs in Kyrgyzstan. “The MDGs are fully in compliance with the objectives set up by the people of Kyrgyzstan and which are reflected in the Constitution of the country, CDF and NSPR. These fundamental documents formulate the vision of goals and objectives for the development of Kyrgyzstan in the first decade of the XXI century and establish the principles and mechanisms of their implementation. The CDF and NSPR emphasize three major components of the overall goal of Kyrgyzstan’s development, which, in their essence, coincide with the MDGs:

  • Enhancement of effective and transparent governance;
  • Building a fair society, ensuring protection for every citizen and human development;
  • Ensuring sustainable economic growth.

For the MDG monitoring to ensure maximum coverage of problems, the UN initiated preparation of reports on the progress in attaining MDGs at a global level and for each UN member country separately. The present report is the first of such for Kyrgyzstan”.

 

This what is UN site is declaring. Now let’s see how much we are closer to MDGs now with aid assistance.  I have tried to find concrete data on each MDGs from the country goals and specific targets achievement. It was practically impossible.  We can’t measure development results and role of aid. 

Aid effectiveness and relations between actors is either not very clear or power disbalanced. Who is determining what in aid construction -  this question needs a serious response.  It is clear that country ownership is  debatable.

 

Human rights and aid effectiveness – are they integral components?

Women’s Human rights and aid

 

Aid as a tool to eliminate various discrimination and protection of human rights. Measuring gender equality of the aid delivery and its role in aid effectiveness is an issues itself.

Gender equality includes women’s rights as part of development process. The regions with the lowest GEI values are Central Asia (60), sub-Saharan Africa (54), South Asia (52) and the Middle East and North Africa(48). In general women’s  issues in the framework of gender equality is formulated inKyrgyzstan in the national Action Plan on GE – and requires for its effective and full implementation about 3 million $ US. State budget is providing for this 2007 year 600.000 soms, which is equal to 17,000 US$. This is less then 2% of needed funds. Where is aid effectiveness?

 

It is recognized that citizens’ participation, human rights should be crosscutting lenses for aid. Participation of people themselves is essential in the period of radical changes in countries. Development is dependent on level of women’s involvement in aid.

 

Roles of actors: governments, donors, civil society organizations

 

In Kyrgyzstan civil society organizations participate in donors’ meeting with consultative role on country aid programs,

So civil society organizations are playing the following role

  • Consultative
  • Aid delivery

 

Relations between donors, State and NGOs

Gaps:

Aid agenda is designed primarily by donors and State. NGOs are not involved in agenda development.

Main relations are built betweendonorsState, and NGOs act as watching unit at aid programs’ presentations with very limited capacity and chances to impact or change agenda.

 

NGOs may be considered for direct investment as development actors. The reasons for this are:

  • Positive experience of women’s credit lines aimed at reduction of poverty and thus assisting to reach MDGs

 

Visible indicators of involvement into international aid’s programs

-          lists of civil society organizations

-          regular invitation to consultative meetings with ADB, WB,

 

Gaps in for keeping development efforts on-track

-          language of communication and information availability

-          lack of sustainable reflection of civil society’s input into donor’s aid program

-          lack of ICT capacity and ability of civil society organizations countrywide

 

NGOs and aid effectiveness

In general aid – concept, priorities, delivery, monitoring of outcome and impact level results, drawing lessons of good practice from accumulated experience is not open to civil society organizations

Is there an interest in engagement from civil society organizations? – yes. Various consultative meetings demonstrate such interest and disappointment with lack of such engagement.

Very few civil society organizations are aware of Paris declaration, no NGOs are involved into the international discussion of the aid effectiveness or Financing for Development.

As development actors, CSOs inKyrgyzstandefinitely share an interest in  development of and participation in dialogues among all development cooperation actors. Decade long participation of civil society organizations inKyrgyzstanin discussions of international aid to our country indicate that there is considerable interest in engaging in this sort of dialogue.  Various solid and sound recommendations were developed by NGOs for donors on forms and ways on better engagement of civil society organizations in aid effectiveness discussions. Main areas of suggested involvement laid in international aid monitoring and in promoting State and Donors’ accountability and demand for results. In Kyrgyzstan as recipient aid country, to date there has been almost no collaboration between governments and CSOs in trying to make aid effective.

 

New possible approach to aid effectiveness

New actors in business – women in medium and big business. Gender balance as a decoration of  big talks or a real working instrument in increasing aid effectiveness? Gender disbalance in capital ownership as a barrier to aid effectiveness. Women inKyrgyzstanown about 15 percent of property and capital. Increase of access to big funds for women in business will lead to more effective management.

 

Women and local business people need access to credits through States’ opening of access to funds. State may play a role as a guarantor to World Banks big credits. This is a longer and more complicated, but more sustainable  way to strengthening local economies with substantial portion of women. Magic Box received a 1,5 million credit for local business – why not local business. It is clear that local business is less prepared to compete on equal condition – but when and how local business will get this needed level of competence, if  State and donors’ community won’t take a shared responsibility for development. Local business development alongside with local governance strengthening will never catch up with international corporation and always will lose, and aid will have to be there to support. So this paradigm of support it effective from local development perspective.

Are aid providers ready to take more comprehensive and complicated approach? Forum’s program on strengthening conditions for 50 local women’s medium business. They need aid. Later they will serve themselves the internal country’s need.

Conclusion

  • Aid was growing
  • Poverty increasing among certain layers of society
  • Increase of the Gap between rich and poor
  • Alienation of local civil society organizations from the international debates on the issue
  • Impact of globalization is growing
  • Aid and financial security of the country – HIPIC in Kyrgyzstan
  • Civil society organizations capacity on involvement increase
  • Chaotic and eclectic involvement of civil society organizations into aid effectiveness achievement
  • Lack of Financing for women leading to gender imbalance in access to economic and consequently to political power
  • Growing role of civil society organizations in development
  • Growing recognition of civil society organizations’ contribution to development
  • Growing need in civil society organizations’ capacity to be effectively involved
  • Gender equality is not reached. Financing for gender equality national programs
  • Lack of gender equality indicators in FFD


 

Report by NURGUL DJANAEVA (FORUM FOR WOMEN’S NGOs)  at the meeting on Aid effectiveness, 9 October 6, 2007

 Women, decision-making and aid effectiveness – some comparisons

 

High participation of women in governance and at decision-making tables and aid priorities and gender equality  inParisdeclaration action plans.

 

Article 42 of Paris Declaration says: gender equality …

What is done?

Do women and their organizations apply PD? Not really. Case of Kyrgyzstan– nobody uses and even very few are aware of PD.

 

The Gender Equity Index (GEI) information on 40 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa,36 in Europe,28 inLatin America and the Caribbean,19 in the Middle East and North Africa,18 in East Asia and the Pacific,6 in Central Asia,5 in South Asia and2 in North America. Together these countries represent more than 90% of the world’s population. Rwandaranks in the third highest spot on the 2007 GEI  list with a score of 84, afterSweden(89) and Finland(also 84) and followed byNorway(83).

Country Women in decision-making Paris Declaration action plan Priorities
Rwanda
Sweden WomenCountries’ increase of development processes ownership and participation
USA Whenever possible, donor priorities and activities must be consistent withnational poverty reduction strategies. -  What does it mean – whenever possible? – it should be always!?
Kyrgyzstan 0 – 18 No action plan No women’s issues

 

 

Keeping development efforts on-track

Improved understanding of the applicability and limitations of the Paris Declaration on Aid effectiveness for addressing issues of importance to CSOs

Aid effectiveness issues in Kyrgyzstan

 

 

Identification of any special regional aid effectiveness characteristics:

 

  • Reflection of the social, economical and political context: Aid effectiveness in the countries with transitional — from socialist to market — economies should seriously consider assistance in sustaining of the positive heritage. Examples: community kindergartens are not valid with state and well maintained kindergartens, educational projects of ADB with one dollar initiative,
  • High level of human capital in terms of general education
  • Growing women’s economic disempowerment of women as a result of the decade long privatization process. Increasing access to financial resources for women in medium business
  • Growing decrease of women on high level decision-making positions which effects the effectiveness of any aid

 

 

 


Central Asian network activities


Central Asia at APWLD’s Feminist Legal Theory and Practice

Training in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, 17-19 October 2008

Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (APWLD) is an independent, non-government, non-profit organisation committed to enabling women to use law as an instrument of social change and to promote women’s human rights. APWLD is the only regional network addressing the issue of women, law and development in the Asia-Pacific and has an outreach with a wide network of women’s and human rights NGOs and individuals in the region.

APWLD in cooperation with Forum of Women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan has held 17-19 October 2008 a Central Asian Sub Regional Gender and Politics Level 1 Training Workshop.

Participants were women activists, planning to enter or working in political decision making positions from Central Asian region: 4 from Kazakhstan, 4 from Uzbekistan, 5 from Tajikistan, and 12 from Kyrgyzstan. Total participants were 27. Among them: Lawyers  – 2, Activists – all, Members of local elected councils  — 3,  Academics -  2, Youth -  3.  Among them: from NGOs — 23, from universities -1, local elected councils members – 3 (they are also activists from NGOs).

All participants were recommended by Central Asian Forum network members.

Facilitator/Resource persons: Four trainers worked: Nurgul Djanaeva, Rashila Ramli, June Sulehan, Bermet Stakeeva. One trainer fromIndia was replaced by Kyrgyzstan trainer (from APWLD list of trainers) due to visa problems and cancel of arrival to training.

 

As planned guest speaker. Gulnara Derbisheva, an MP from Kyrgyzstan national Parliament met with participants.

 

Conclusions and Recommendations:

Training showed that it was a good decision to hold training workshop on level 1. Translation to sub-regional language is recommended if training is held in a sub-region.

Selection of participants followed given criteria.

Forum of Women’s NGOs of  Kyrgyzstan has asked participants to bring with them to training set of national laws and data on women’s in politics. It was useful during practical work at cross country comparisons to share and learn from each other and development of further recommendations.

 

 

 

 

Central Asia at APWLD’s Feminist Legal Theory and Practice Training

 Chiang Mai,  29 September – 6 October 2007

With the initiative of Forum of women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan, Shahlo Djuraeva (Public organization “Djakhon”,Tajikistan) was trained in Feminist Legal Theory and Practice of APWLD inBangkok,Thailand.

The specific objectives of the training were:

  • To serve as a venue for participants to share experiences in using law in advocacy on women’s concerns;
  • To develop greater understanding of gender, discrimination, equality, law and human rights;
  • To identify and discuss issues and dilemmas encountered by women’s rights advocates in their use of legal strategies to address women’s concerns;
  • To enhance the capability of participants to effectively challenge discriminatory laws and practices in their countries by feminist, rights-based legal practice and by applying international conventions and precedents for advancement of women’s rights.

Participants looked at social, cultural and political contexts that form legal system, such as:

-          Creation of a platform where participants can share experience of using legislation to lobby women’s issues;

-          Raising awareness of such concepts as gender, discrimination, equality, legislation and human rights;

-          Determining and discussing problems and dilemmas faced by women human rights defenders while using legal strategies in work with women’s issues;

Raising potential of participants for effective work against discriminating laws and practices in their respective countries; work based on human rights, using international conventions and precedents to advance women’s rights.

 

 

 

 

 

Central Asia at APWLD’s Regional Gender and Politics Training

Workshop: Level 1.  Skills and Capacity-Building for Women Political Leaders 

Bangkok, Thailand, 27-29 July 2007

Gulnara Derbisheva, Chinara Kartanbaeva from the Forum’s program “Women’s participation in political processes” passé this training.

Capacity building workshops for women political leaders is part of a training initiative of the WPPP Programme and is held:

  • to further develop decision making capacity of participating women political leaders;
  • to share experiences and develop skills of participants on how to raise gender issues within existing political institutions;
  • to develop capacity of participants on how to mainstream gender issues within political systems from a women’s human rights approach; and
  • to enhance the capacity of participants to promote  and fulfill women’s human rights, including the right to take part in governance at all levels including local, national, regional and international level.

 

This Training Workshop, using the newly completed Level 1 training manual, is aimed at building the skills and capacity of women who want to engage in political processes and advance women’s agendas in their respective countries and across the Region.

 

The objectives for this three day Training Workshop are for aspiring women leaders:

  1. to increase their capacity to reflect on and understand gender issues;
  2. to enhance their understanding of non-discrimination, equality, politics and decision making processes in politics;
  3. to share experiences and develop skills of participants on how to raise gender issues within existing political institutions; and
  4. to identify personal, social and political barriers to women’s participation in political processes in general.

 

The Workshop sessions will focus on the following themes: politics and political systems; gender and patriarchy; politics for change; leadership for social transformation, legislation; and advocacy and lobbying for gender and issues.

 

 

 

Cooperation with women’s NGO “Jahon», Tajikistan

 

Kyrgyzstan was represented by the president of Forum of women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan, Nurgul Djanaeva, deputy head of Karakulja rayon administration ofOshprovince

 

Nurlan Ismanova and head of NGO “Bukamal” Buziya Kamalidinova.

 

 

The main topics of discussion were: gender legislation of Tajikistan, political parties as one of the means of involving women in politics, experience of women’s political movement of other countries, role of civil society in forming women’s political leadership.

 

In the course of the conference, Nurgul Djanaeva held a presentation of  “Women in politics” program. Nurlan Ismanova shared about her experience of working in rayon state administration and partnering with women’s organizations.

become part of leadership of local government.

 

The result of the conference was adoption of recommendations on increasing women’s participation in political processes.

 

 

 

2003 

Central Asian training workshop “Women’s political participation

 

Goal of the training

–        To increase of women’s knowledge and skills for participation in political processes.

–        Better understanding of special positive measures

–        Determine ways and tools to include gender into political agenda

–        Better knowledge of good practices

 

 

Holding training “ Women’s political participation”

 

Participants were from:

 

  Kyrgyzstan(11),Uzbekistan(3), Tadjikistan (1), Kazahkstan (4).

 

  Outcomes

 

-          19 women fromCentral Asiaincreased their knowledge and skills on women’s political advancement and growth of gender equality in politics

-          countries’ cases on compared with the international rates of representation in decision-making

-          joint plan of women’s network of politicians is discussed

-          women’s Central Asian Forum agreed to consider application of the used manual inCentral Asia

-          First training by women’s NGOs on political knowledge and skills is made and got positive assessment

-          Publication and dissemination in Central Asian of the training materials on “Women’s political participation”